Early Experiences and Health

Susceptibility to disease limits quality of life and longevity. A significant health inequality in the U.S. is that children are not equally susceptible to disease. Stress in childhood can enhance disease susceptibility across the lifespan. And yet, while some individuals are susceptible to the effects of early stress, some thrive despite this early disadvantage. We seek to identify the mechanisms of vulnerability and resilience to help people to live longer and healthier lives.


Recent Publications


Kinnally E. L., Martinez, S.J., Chun, K., Capitanio, J.P., Ceniceros, L. Early Social Stress Promotes Inflammation and Adverse Health Outcomes in Rhesus Monkeys. In review.

 

Kinnally, E.L. (2014) Epigenetic Plasticity Following Early Stress Predicts Long-Term Health Outcomes in Rhesus Macaques. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 55(2):192-9.


Developmental Genomic Programming

Epigenetics

 Chromatin remodeling, or epigenomic reprogramming, has emerged as an instrumental component of the long-term effects of stress on disease. Epigenetic marks, which shape how and when genes are expressed, are malleable to early life exposures.  We are interested in the role of epigenetics on the long-term effects of early stress on health in humans and non-human primates.


Recent Publications

  

Kinnally, E.L. (2014) Epigenetic Plasticity Following Early Stress Predicts Long-Term Health Outcomes in Rhesus Macaques. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 55(2):192-9.


Kinnally, E.L. Feinberg, C., Kim, D., Ferguson, K., Leibel, R., Coplan, J.D., and Mann, J.J. (2011) DNA Methylation as a Risk Factor in the Effects of Early Life Stress. Brain, Behavior and Immunity, 25 (8): 1548-53.


Kinnally, E.L., Capitanio, J.P, Leibel, R Deng, L., LeDuc, C., Haghighi, F., and Mann, J.J. (2010) Epigenetic Regulation of Serotonin Transporter Expression and Behavior in Infant Rhesus Macaques. Genes, Brain and Behavior, 9, 575-582.

Transgenerational Effects of Stress

Vertical transmission of traits across generations likely relies on a variety of mechanisms, from genetic to prenatal and social. Recently, it has become clear that non-social mechanisms may also play a role. Our lab examines the effects of ancestral exposures on development.

Recent Publications


Kinnally, E.L., Gonzalez, M.N., Capitanio, J.P. Three Generations of Paternal Line Transgenerational Effects of Early Experience in Rhesus Macaques. In review.


Kinnally, E.L., Ceniceros, L., Martinez, S.J. Intergenerational Transmission of Maternal Care in Rhesus Macaques. In review.

  

Kinnally, E.L. and Capitanio, J.P. (2015) Paternal Early Experiences Influence Infant Development through Non-Social Mechanisms in Rhesus Macaques. Frontiers in Zoology, 12, S14.


 Kinnally, E.L. Feinberg, C., Kim, D., Ferguson, K., Coplan, J.D., and Mann, J.J. (2013) Transgenerational Effects of Early Variable Foraging Demand Stress in Female Bonnet Macaques. American Journal of Primatology, 75, 509-17